Astronomy Colloquium - Eileen Gonzales

Image
Image Description and Credit: Artist's conception of a T-type brown dwarf star, which is more hot and massive compared to other planets, and yet, lacks the mass required to be a star. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)
September 22, 2022
3:00PM - 4:00PM
Location
In Person & Online: Chem & Biomolecular Eng & Chem (CBEC) - Room 130; Zoom Webinar

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2022-09-22 15:00:00 2022-09-22 16:00:00 Astronomy Colloquium - Eileen Gonzales Read Between the Spectral Lines: Characterizing Substellar Atmospheres Brown dwarfs and directly imaged self-luminous exoplanets are interesting and complex worlds that form a critical stepping stone along the path to imaging Earth-like planets. By examining their atmospheres in detail we can better understand their thermal profiles, chemical composition, and cloud properties that are tightly coupled with their formation and evolution. In this talk, I will explain how I use atmospheric retrievals, a powerful inverse modeling technique, to examine the atmospheres of brown dwarfs. I will present results from a comparative sample of brown dwarfs showing how they have enhanced our understanding of the atmospheres of substellar objects and our retrieval approach. Lastly, I will discuss how JWST and next-generation observatories will enhance our understanding of substellar atmospheres serving as a critical bridge in our exploration of smaller and cooler worlds. Speaker: Eileen Gonzales, Carl Sagan Institute, Cornell University Image Description and Credit: Artist's conception of a T-type brown dwarf star, which is more hot and massive compared to other planets, and yet, lacks the mass required to be a star. (NASA/JPL-Caltech) In Person & Online: Chem & Biomolecular Eng & Chem (CBEC) - Room 130; Zoom Webinar Department of Astronomy astronomy@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

Read Between the Spectral Lines: Characterizing Substellar Atmospheres

Brown dwarfs and directly imaged self-luminous exoplanets are interesting and complex worlds that form a critical stepping stone along the path to imaging Earth-like planets. By examining their atmospheres in detail we can better understand their thermal profiles, chemical composition, and cloud properties that are tightly coupled with their formation and evolution. In this talk, I will explain how I use atmospheric retrievals, a powerful inverse modeling technique, to examine the atmospheres of brown dwarfs. I will present results from a comparative sample of brown dwarfs showing how they have enhanced our understanding of the atmospheres of substellar objects and our retrieval approach. Lastly, I will discuss how JWST and next-generation observatories will enhance our understanding of substellar atmospheres serving as a critical bridge in our exploration of smaller and cooler worlds.

Speaker: Eileen Gonzales, Carl Sagan Institute, Cornell University

Image Description and Credit: Artist's conception of a T-type brown dwarf star, which is more hot and massive compared to other planets, and yet, lacks the mass required to be a star. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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