Astronomy Colloquium - Rupali Chandar

Image
Sagittarius Star Cloud
January 16, 2020
3:00PM - 4:00PM
Location
0130 CBEC

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2020-01-16 15:00:00 2020-01-16 16:00:00 Astronomy Colloquium - Rupali Chandar

From Birth to Death: The Life Cycle of Star Clusters

Rupali Chandar - University of Toledo

There is now evidence that many stars form together in groups and clusters, rather than individually.  This means that most stars that we observe in galaxies have, at some point, lived in a star cluster, and that the life cycle of star clusters tells us about the build up of galaxies.  I will review our basic picture for the life cycle of star clusters, from their birth in molecular clouds to their dissolution into the (unclustered) field star population within their host galaxy. This picture is motivated by observational studies of the molecular cloud and young cluster populations in a number of nearby galaxies of different types and environments (e.g., dwarf, giant, spiral, irregular, interacting, quiescent). Underlying the apparent diversity and complexity of these cloud and cluster systems, on galaxy scales some intriguing regularities emerge.

Coffee and Donuts will be served at 2:30pm in 4054 McPherson Lab.

0130 CBEC Department of Astronomy astronomy@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

From Birth to Death: The Life Cycle of Star Clusters

Rupali Chandar - University of Toledo

There is now evidence that many stars form together in groups and clusters, rather than individually.  This means that most stars that we observe in galaxies have, at some point, lived in a star cluster, and that the life cycle of star clusters tells us about the build up of galaxies.  I will review our basic picture for the life cycle of star clusters, from their birth in molecular clouds to their dissolution into the (unclustered) field star population within their host galaxy. This picture is motivated by observational studies of the molecular cloud and young cluster populations in a number of nearby galaxies of different types and environments (e.g., dwarf, giant, spiral, irregular, interacting, quiescent). Underlying the apparent diversity and complexity of these cloud and cluster systems, on galaxy scales some intriguing regularities emerge.

Coffee and Donuts will be served at 2:30pm in 4054 McPherson Lab.