Astronomy Colloquium

Image
Image
Artist's impression of a neutron-star merger (Courtesy: NASA)
October 17, 2019
4:00PM - 5:00PM
Location
E0040 Scott Laboratory

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2019-10-17 16:00:00 2019-10-17 17:00:00 Astronomy Colloquium

Tracing the Chemical Origins of Exoplanetary Worlds

Ke Zhang - University of Michigan

The compositions of planets are primarily set by the compositions of gas, ice, and dust inside protoplanetary disks. The abundances of carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen elemental carriers are particularly important for atmospheric compositions and ultimately habitability of planets. Constraining how these elemental abundances evolve with time and location in natal disks is key to predict compositions of planetesimals and planets. In the age of ALMA, we can spatially resolve emissions of abundant molecules in nearby disks on the Solar System scales. I will present recent observations on locations of snowlines and chemical structures of main carbon carriers in protoplanetary disks. I will discuss these findings in light of recent numerical simulations of chemical evolution and dust growth/transport processes in disks. The comparison between observations and simulations suggests the physical and chemical processes of planet formation are highly coupled.

E0040 Scott Laboratory Department of Astronomy astronomy@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

Tracing the Chemical Origins of Exoplanetary Worlds

Ke Zhang - University of Michigan

The compositions of planets are primarily set by the compositions of gas, ice, and dust inside protoplanetary disks. The abundances of carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen elemental carriers are particularly important for atmospheric compositions and ultimately habitability of planets. Constraining how these elemental abundances evolve with time and location in natal disks is key to predict compositions of planetesimals and planets. In the age of ALMA, we can spatially resolve emissions of abundant molecules in nearby disks on the Solar System scales. I will present recent observations on locations of snowlines and chemical structures of main carbon carriers in protoplanetary disks. I will discuss these findings in light of recent numerical simulations of chemical evolution and dust growth/transport processes in disks. The comparison between observations and simulations suggests the physical and chemical processes of planet formation are highly coupled.